First use of weather forecasts to show human impact on extreme weather is “transformational”, scientists say

30 May 2024

National forecasting centres like the Met Office could use the same tools used for weather forecasting to quantify how human behaviour is aggravating major events like floods, heatwaves and storms, climate scientists at Oxford University Physics show in a study to be published today (30/5) in Nature Communications

Oxford climate physicists, led by Professor Myles Allen, have, for the first time, demonstrated how state-of-the-art weather forecasts can be used to show how greenhouse gas emissions affect extreme weather. In new studies of recent events in both the UK and U.S., they assessed the impact of global warming at a local scale and found that human activity both worsened specific weather events and made them more likely to occur.

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First proof that 'plunging regions' exist around black holes

16 May 2024

Einstein has been proved correct with a key prediction about black holes, an international team led by researchers at Oxford University Physics has found. Using X-ray data to test a key prediction of Einstein’s theory of gravity, their study, published today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, gives the first observational proof that a 'plunging-region' around black holes not only exists, but exerts some of the strongest gravitational forces yet identified in the galaxy. 

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PR & Media Contact: Tessa Curtis, Department of Physics
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Breakthrough promises secure quantum computing at home

11 April 2024

The full power of next-generation quantum computing could soon be harnessed by millions of individuals and companies, thanks to a breakthrough by scientists at Oxford University Physics guaranteeing security and privacy. This advance promises to unlock the transformative potential of cloud-based quantum computing and is detailed in a new study published in Physical Review Letters.

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PR & Media Contact: Tessa Curtis, Department of Physics
E: tessa.curtis@physics.ox.ac.uk
M: +44 7767 654122