Evidence for metastable photo-induced superconductivity in K3C60

NATURE PHYSICS (2021)

Authors:

M Budden, T Gebert, M Buzzi, G Jotzu, E Wang, T Matsuyama, G Meier, Y Laplace, D Pontiroli, M Ricco, F Schlawin, D Jaksch, A Cavalleri

Analytical solution for the steady states of the driven Hubbard model

Physical Review B American Physical Society 103:3 (2021) 35146

Authors:

J Tindall, F Schlawin, Ma Sentef, D Jaksch

Abstract:

Under the action of coherent periodic driving a generic quantum system will undergo Floquet heating and continuously absorb energy until it reaches a featureless thermal state. The phase-space constraints induced by certain symmetries can, however, prevent this and allow the system to dynamically form robust steady states with off-diagonal long-range order. In this work, we take the Hubbard model on an arbitrary lattice with arbitrary filling and, by simultaneously diagonalizing the two possible SU(2) symmetries of the system, we analytically construct the correlated steady states for different symmetry classes of driving. This construction allows us to make verifiable, quantitative predictions about the long-range particle-hole and spin-exchange correlations that these states can possess. In the case when both SU(2) symmetries are preserved in the thermodynamic limit we show how the driving can be used to form a unique condensate which simultaneously hosts particle-hole and spin-wave order.

A quantum inspired approach to exploit turbulence structures

Preprint available at arXiv:2106.05782

Authors:

N. Gourianov, M. Lubasch, S. Dolgov, QY van den Berg, H. Babaee, P. Givi, M. Kiffner, D. Jaksch

Abstract:

Understanding turbulence is the key to our comprehension of many natural and technological flow processes. At the heart of this phenomenon lies its intricate multi-scale nature, describing the coupling between different-sized eddies in space and time. Here we introduce a new paradigm for analyzing the structure of turbulent flows by quantifying correlations between different length scales using methods inspired from quantum many-body physics. We present results for interscale correlations of two paradigmatic flow examples, and use these insights along with tensor network theory to design a structure-resolving algorithm for simulating turbulent flows. With this algorithm, we find that the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations can be accurately solved within a computational space reduced by over an order of magnitude compared to direct numerical simulation. Our quantum-inspired approach provides a pathway towards conducting computational fluid dynamics on quantum computers.

Bethe ansatz approach for dissipation: exact solutions of quantum many-body dynamics under loss

New Journal of Physics IOP Publishing 22 (2020) 123040

Authors:

Berislav Buca, Cameron Booker, Marko Medenjak, Dieter Jaksch

Abstract:

We develop a Bethe ansatz based approach to study dissipative systems experiencing loss. The method allows us to exactly calculate the spectra of interacting, many-body Liouvillians. We discuss how the dissipative Bethe ansatz opens the possibility of analytically calculating the dynamics of a wide range of experimentally relevant models including cold atoms subjected to one and two body losses, coupled cavity arrays with bosons escaping the cavity, and cavity quantum electrodynamics. As an example of our approach we study the relaxation properties in a boundary driven XXZ spin chain. We exactly calculate the Liouvillian gap and find different relaxation rates with a novel type of dynamical dissipative phase transition. This physically translates into the formation of a stable domain wall in the easy-axis regime despite the presence of loss. Such analytic results have previously been inaccessible for systems of this type.

Quantum electrodynamic control of matter: cavity-enhanced ferroelectric phase transition

Physical Review X American Physical Society 10 (2020) 041027

Authors:

Yuto Ashida, A Imamoglu, J Faist

Abstract:

The light-matter interaction can be utilized to qualitatively alter physical properties of materials. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have explored this possibility of controlling matter by light based on driving many-body systems via strong classical electromagnetic radiation, leading to a time-dependent Hamiltonian for electronic or lattice degrees of freedom. To avoid inevitable heating, pump-probe setups with ultrashort laser pulses have so far been used to study transient light-induced modifications in materials. Here, we pursue yet another direction of controlling quantum matter by modifying quantum fluctuations of its electromagnetic environment. In contrast to earlier proposals on light-enhanced electron-electron interactions, we consider a dipolar quantum many-body system embedded in a cavity composed of metal mirrors and formulate a theoretical framework to manipulate its equilibrium properties on the basis of quantum light-matter interaction. We analyze hybridization of different types of the fundamental excitations, including dipolar phonons, cavity photons, and plasmons in metal mirrors, arising from the cavity confinement in the regime of strong light-matter interaction. This hybridization qualitatively alters the nature of the collective excitations and can be used to selectively control energy-level structures in a wide range of platforms. Most notably, in quantum paraelectrics, we show that the cavity-induced softening of infrared optical phonons enhances the ferroelectric phase in comparison with the bulk materials. Our findings suggest an intriguing possibility of inducing a superradiant-type transition via the light-matter coupling without external pumping. We also discuss possible applications of the cavity-induced modifications in collective excitations to molecular materials and excitonic devices.